Marianas Variety

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    Tuesday, October 23, 2018-9:51:14A.M.

     

     

     

     

     

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OPINION: Corrective perspective

LONG suffering is called patience. Why is that? Because when you’re in distress you ask God to help you. Not on your time though, but on  God’s own time. Can you wait that long?

I was told by a close friend that I have been very very patient with the Oregon health authority staff who  took away my visiting rights.

All I need is God’s time to correct the wrong done to me and my wife  by Oregon’s mental health officials. They committed this family crisis.

In my long suffering the patience I have is called love and self-control because that’s who I am. Others get their message across by inflicting deadly collateral damage.

When our emotions are trying to get the best of us in our frustration, anger or outrage, it’s hard to stay calm under pressure and in moments of distress.

I cannot see myself harming others out of outrage, anger or frustration because I came from law-abiding, tight-knit families. I respect and honor our customs and culture.

When you ran out of emotions your mind becomes numb. You are drained emotionally and physically but not spiritually if you have a deep strong faith in God and family core values.

Faith gives you confidence, motivation and determination to fight daily as you plan, and prepare and organize every resources you have every day.

Some say time is patience while others say time is a sickness. Humans always fight time 24/7. We wake up every morning to make a living and punch in our time-clock.

It was my brother who told me to speak up due to the fact that I preferred to be quiet and to listen. But it was not because I was shy but it was just because I was born this way.

While love doesn’t come to me naturally it enables me to do all things out of love. It helps me to check my heart before I say anything.

Marriage put my life in a corrective perspective because I became very responsible for the well-being of the woman I love  so much.

I consider it a law: my obligation to my wife. I must protect her and care for her no matter how rough or tough it gets.

But in life sickness happens. It’s important to love but not to be so possessive because love can kill you with a heartache.

Before I got married I did wrestle with all the possible consequences and surprises whenever life would throw us a curveball. Marriage is for better or for worst. Your wife is your happiness.

But when county staff took away my wife and my visiting rights, I decided to fight for justice with all my heart and soul.

I cannot let evildoers take away my life or my wife Shuchun because my wife is my obligation and the very reason I am fighting evildoers.

Some of the laws in our society today are created by lawmakers to help evildoers wreak havoc on our society. And for what? For money and greed. They are ruthless and cruel.

The pharmaceutical CEOs control the U.S. Congress. It’s all about money. They have stripped investigators of their power.

Imagine the opioids that have killed a lot of Americans already. It’s the very reason I am fighting evildoers who use and abuse their patients in America today.

The politicians we vote into U.S. Congress are the ones tailoring all these crazy U.S. laws for the love of money and self-enrichment.

It is so easy and tempting to give  up when we know that the authorities are against us. We feel helpless, powerless and hopeless.

It is tempting to quit and move toward greener pastures when your supervisors and other authority figures are displeased with your level of performance.

But don’t give up. Don’t let them push you to do any collateral damage. Stand your ground firmly on your ethical principles. Fight back and fight for what is right.

As a powerful advocate of my wife and the people of the CNMI, I want to prove lawmakers wrong. I can fix any pressing issue and my goal is to excel in making wise choices.

In conclusion, every family wants to visit their loved ones in the hospital and that’s among the family members’ responsibilities and obligations to humanity today.

Everyone must follow the moral law.

The writer is a resident of Porland, Oregon.