Marianas Variety

Last updateSat, 23 Mar 2019 8am

Headlines:

     

     

     

     

     

    Saturday, March 23, 2019-8:10:17P.M.

     

     

     

     

     

Font Size

Settings

OPINION | Unpredictable future

THE truth is, we all don’t know what the majority Democrats will roll out on their U.S. House agenda in  2019. It remains to be seen for sure.

But with Republicans controlling the U.S. Senate and the White House we could be in for a stalemate or a real surprise for all American families.

Democrats might roll back Trump’s financial banking rules and regs. Some think tank financial analysts believe we could be heading into an economic recession.

In the last month we have seen how the U.S. stock market dropped or recovered. But the good news is, U.S. shoppers and consumers spent more money in the last holiday season.

The bad news is that with the U.S. government shutdown it’s a double-edged sword, especially for the 400,000 to 800,000 federal employees who are really concerned about their jobs.

The new U.S. tax laws that the GOP passed were supposed to help hard-working middle-class American families, but the Democratic Party disagrees. Democrats believe that the new tax laws only help the top earners and mega-corporations in the U.S. while the 90 percent low earners are left with a stagnant annual income.

I know that the CNMI and Oregon governors gave their state employees a good decent pay raise, but both have their own budget deficits that need to be addressed annually.

The irony about this is that Democrats and Republicans in Oregon and the CNMI both favor rich big corporations.

Both state governments must protect their retirement funds from going belly up.

I myself cannot rely on both of these state governments anymore including the U.S. federal government because it’s all about  favoritism and connections.

When your CNMI government only relies on the Chinese casino payouts for the islands’ retiree benefits, and cannot run its government operation properly, then that is a real concern for all retirees.

For Oregon, the hefty payouts for state retirees are also a big concern today. The big bubble could burst into a financial meltdown.

But because you’re the majority party you pretty much do what you want while lying to your people. It’s part of a majority party’s political agendas.

In 2019 here in the U.S., more states are coming forward to hike their state’s minimum wage. It would help CNMI workers too if the local minimum wage is raised.

My point is: fair is fair, right folks? It’s a win-win situation for the CNMI and Oregon  to hike their pay rates for their workforce, right?

Let’s hope the U.S. House Democrats prevent massive layoffs that are looming in the United States because of its trade war with China. I hope that the U.S. House Democrats can do better than Trump’s trade war with China.

We know that the CNMI depends on China investments and we don’t want any more surprise layoffs at IPI. We want our CNMI people to work.

I myself want to get off the retirees’ payday because I got better and healthier last year so I will be undergoing training to get a new job.

The truth is, we islanders are not lazy if we’re given the opportunity to work — we are more than happy to work and to be reliable, too.

It’s just politics that can ruin our people’s lives because it’s true: favoritism and who-you-know can land you a good job anywhere.

That doesn’t help smart, qualified and good workers.

If we can be fair and level the hiring process it would help our brightest.

The Honorable Kilili recently expressed concerns about FEMA. It’s an issue that I hammered home last month when I asked if the CNMI could do better than Puerto Rico, right?

I also want to ask why the local GOP lawmakers are very quiet about land compensation payouts, and why it’s taking so long. Come on GOP guys, move it.

In closing, we always hope for a good year for families who want to look for jobs and new opportunities, so count me in. I am ready to work and to keep my writing job in the CNMI.

The writer is a resident of Portland, Oregon.