Marianas Variety

Last updateSat, 20 Apr 2019 12am

Headlines:

     

     

     

     

     

    Saturday, April 20, 2019-2:13:44P.M.

     

     

     

     

     

Font Size

Settings

OPINION | Broken, dysfunctional government

DON’T forget that President Trump cheated his way into the White House by covering up his paid-off hush-hush money to two women  to become president of the United States of America.

Let’s not forget folks that there are ongoing lawsuits filed against this President plus the ongoing special counsel investigation of possible questionable actions.

For the 800,000 federal employees to go another week without their paychecks is stressful and painful especially for their families. It’s frustrating if you don’t have money to buy food for your families.

The longer this shutdown goes on the more pressure on families who need to pay their monthly bills. Lawsuits were already being filed last week.

The influx of refugees into the U.S.  is a result of other government officials who don’t want to enforce law and order in their countries. This is a criminal act.

We cannot protect our U.S. borders if other countries allow this massive influx of refugees into the United States. But while I sympathize with the President I think he just went too far and is hurting U.S. families.

The United Nations or other countries must get tough on leaders of countries who fail to protect their own people and fail to provide law and order as well security to their people.

We cannot keep blaming refugees if their government officials are not providing social services or other job opportunities. We cannot blame innocent refugees. It’s wrong. We must blame their own countries’ leaders.

To be factual or blunt, all leaders around the world must protect their own people, and lawmakers or law enforcement must fight corruption in their own government.

It’s the golden rule of law to protect your government, your community, your people and your reputation or image as lawmakers. Red tape bureaucracy must stop.

No one wants to be responsible or accountable for corruption in their own countries. And this is creating more chaos and hardship for their people. It’s reckless and immoral.

And please stop inserting politics into all this human suffering. You, the leaders of your countries, are the ones who created all these refugee problems in the first place.

World problems are leadership problems and the victims are the people because corruption is ignored. No one should be above the law.

The truth is, leaders are not maintaining law and order due to greed or self-enrichment. It’s happening all over the world and we all know about it.

I’m not only blaming Trump. I am blaming other world leaders who ignore to protect the security of their society. All these leaders must be blamed for all the refugees all over the world today.

It’s no longer about Democrats or Republicans or Communists. These are human atrocities, and leaders are  responsible and accountable for their countries’ lawlessness.

I remember a lawyer in the CNMI who expressed his frustration for not getting his legal fees in a land-compensation case. Corruption is all over the world.

Not to mention kids of war-torn countries who are dying daily of malnutrition and hunger like those in Africa.

The CNMI, which is an investment partners of China and the United States, is no exception. All countries are breaking their laws and their leaders want to ignore corruption.

The Tinian casino corruption happened on a tiny island of the CNMI because of  government officials’ reckless actions.

I may be from tiny islands in the Pacific Ocean but I am an international global writer of the United States of America today, and I have to voice out my opinions and concerns worldwide.

Because this is my job. This is what I do. This is my passion and I am fighting for  human rights today. I’m a U.S. citizen who is communicating to all world leaders and to the United Nations.

I  can blame CNMI leaders too for the same reasons I blamed Trump for not providing security to our federal government workers or our typhoon victims.

All this monkey-see-monkey-do-monkey-business is creating hardship for humanity. The United Nations  and U.S. officials must stop it and the massive refugee problems around the world.

I get so passionate in my writing job that sometimes I forget to be kind and compassionate to the leaders of the CNMI even though I am speaking the truth about our U.S.- CNMI leaders.

Let me take a moment and pray for our world leaders today.

Lord, I pray for world leaders to come to their senses to stop corruption and stop abusing their own people and their community and stop creating atrocities worldwide.

“Be still, and know that I am God! I will be honored by every nation. I will be honored throughout the world.” Psalm 46:10

God never loses confidence in us. When we falter, become flustered, or wonder how a situation is going to work out, He reminds us to be still and remember Him.

At the end of it all, we know He will be exalted in every situation and everyone will bow to His name, as His due.

No matter how difficult life gets, how bad you feel or how lost you become, don’t forget who you are.

You were created in the image of God and in the end, you’ll live forever with Him through faith and grace.

Don’t worry about the present when you know who holds the future. Be still, remember who He is, and remember who He created you.

Jesus, help me to be still and remember who You are. Your power and Your glory are not lessened by the turmoil in this world. You have a plan and a purpose for all of us including me. Amen.

A reminder to all world leaders: when you put your hands on the Bible or another holy book when you were sworn in, you  are solemnly swearing that you will serve your country, people and government, and will comply with the code of honor and the code of conduct in office.

To help society, your people and your government, to improve your people’s lives and to be of service to all humanity, please uphold the law. Amen.

The writer is a resident of Portland, Oregon.