Marianas Variety

Last updateTue, 10 Dec 2019 12am

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    Monday, December 9, 2019-12:04:43P.M.

     

     

     

     

     

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Dyenina Diaz, NMC Class of 2012

FOR the NMI the month of May not only ushers in the gorgeously vibrant orange hues of the flame trees but ‘looms” graduates of Northern Marianas College.

Dyenina Diaz, left, poses at a community volunteer health screening in 2011 with fellow NMC nursing students Sarah Kim and Rachelle Alturas. Diaz and Kim are both graduating from NMC’s nursing program on Saturday. Contributed photoDyenina Diaz, left, poses at a community volunteer health screening in 2011 with fellow NMC nursing students Sarah Kim and Rachelle Alturas. Diaz and Kim are both graduating from NMC’s nursing program on Saturday. Contributed photoSome 120 students will walk the ceremony to collect their hard-earned recognition and degrees this Saturday at 4 p.m. at the Marianas High School gymnasium.

In the days leading-up to the commencement festivities Variety would like to introduce to the wider community four future graduates and their inspiring journeys.

On a reporter’s note, it was a privilege and a joy to listen to the students describe their motivations, goals and struggles that imparts an even greater appreciation for the extraordinary value NMC provides the community.

‘P’ for positive

The Commonwealth Healthcare Corp. may be experiencing severe challenges ranging from finances to staffing but one Northern Marianas College nursing graduate remains enthusiastically optimistic about the future.

“The doctors and staff are very encouraging and helpful and I remain really positive about CHC,” stated Diaz when asked where she would like to work after graduation and passing the NCLEX exam for a registered nurse certification.

The pretty, well-spoken, bubbly, smart and always-smiling 22-year-old is a case study of remaining upbeat in the midst of a storm.

Although she explained that as of late hospital staff has expressed more anxiety and sadness than a year-ago, Diaz expressed her strong belief that CHC can and will come back stronger.

“During my two-year clinical rotations I was so impressed with the dedication of the staff and how they help the community even when times are tough.”

Diaz lit up and grinned when asked what clinical experience was her favorite.

“Labor and delivery was a really beautiful experience,” explained Diaz as her bright eyes sparkled.

Even though her family does not count any medical professionals among them Diaz was still convinced the healing profession was her calling.

“I have an insane passion for caring for people … it’s always been my role in the extended family and I love it.”

How does she do it?

In addition to a full-time NMC course load, Diaz is a work-study student in the counseling office, a field-work intern for a Guam-based Beetlenut/Cancer study, does clinical work at CHC from 6:30 a.m. sometimes until 9 p.m., is a member of Phi Theta Kappa (3.5 GPA and above), jogs, plays soccer and takes care of the family.

Diaz ticked-off the grueling schedule in a relaxed, matter-of-fact tone while this reporter tired just imagining the continuous pace of activity.

Meeting Diaz though puts all questions to rest about her workload or exhaustion as she exudes and infects everything around her with energy.

In her presence it is easy to understand that this driven, sunshine-infused young woman has bigger plans on the horizon after attaining some full-time nursing experience.

“First I earned my AA degree in liberal Arts, now it will be an AA in nursing and next it will be my Bachelors of nursing and then a Master’s degree as a nurse practitioner,” reeled off Diaz in describing her academic step-ladder.

This Saturday will be step-two in Diaz’s journey along with 17 other hopeful nursing graduates.

For CHC or any medical organization an infection is usually a bad word but in Diaz’s case her ‘infection of smiles’ might just be the best medicine of all.