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CAO conducts sustainable living program for children

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THE Carolinian Affairs Office is conducting a four-week training for sustainable living through the Tepengi Kkosch Refaluwasch/Caring for our Carolinian Culture program.

Agatha Ketebengang, CAO project director, said they have prepared four different activities for the participating children.

On July 29-July 31, she added, the children learned how to make coconut oil.

“They went through the whole process — husking the coconut, grinding and cooking it,” Ketebengang said.

Because of the social distancing protocol, they limited the number of students to 20 only, she added.

Each week, she said, they conduct two classes on Wednesday and Friday mornings to accommodate more participants.

On Aug. 5 and 7, the children were taught subsistence farming.

Through the help of CAO Executive Assistant John Tagabuel and Mike Fitial, the children learned how to plant banana trees and tapioca.

They also learned the Refaluwasch names of fruits, the parts of plants and agricultural tools.

Ketebengang said they will conduct cooking lessons in the third week of the program and hold a fishing activity in the fourth and final week.

Photos by Lori Lyn C. Lirio

 

 

The Carolinian Affairs Office conducts the Tepengi Kkosch Refaluwasch/Caring for our Carolinian Culture program every Wednesday and Friday at the Carolinian Utt. 

CAO Executive Assistant John Tagabuel teaches children how to use a pickaxe, an agricultural tool.

 

Young participants of the Tepengi Kkosch Refaluwasch/Caring for our Carolinian Culture program learn how to plant tapioca.

 

Tepengi Kkosch Refaluwasch/Caring for our Carolinian Culture program participants help each other in planting a banana stem.

Tepengi Kkosch Refaluwasch/Caring for our Carolinian Culture program participants learn how to plant banana and tapioca on Friday.

“We want to reach out to students and teach them as many Carolinian traditions and knowledge as we can,” Ketebengang said, adding that the program is also an opportunity for children to learn about local culture during a long break from school because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The program was made possible by an Administration for Native Americans or ANA grant, Tagabuel said.

The grant was awarded to the CAO in 2018 for a three-year program that promotes Carolinian culture and traditions.

Ketebengang said this is the third and final year of the program and “we have reached our goal.”

In the past two years, CAO conducted training on arts and crafts, including weaving, mwaar making, beading, dancing, singing and ukulele playing.

The program also taught survival skills, including farming, cooking, rope making and fishing.

Registration to participate in the program is still ongoing, Ketebengang said.

For more information, call the CAO office at 234-6385 or send a message through https://www.facebook.com/Carolinian-Affairs-Office-Bwulasiyool-Refaluwasch-188706355261332

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